Agenda and minutes

Cabinet - Monday 9 March 2015 7.00 pm

Venue: Room 8, Lambeth Town Hall, Brixton Hill, SW2 1RW. View directions

Contact: Katy Shaw, Tel: 020 7926 2225 Email: kshaw3@lambeth.gov.uk 

Items
No. Item

1.

Declarations of Pecuniary Interest

Under Cabinet Rule 1.5.2, where any Cabinet Member has a Disclosable Pecuniary Interest (as defined in the Members’ Code of Conduct (para. 4)) in any matter to be considered at a meeting of the Council, a committee, sub-committee or joint committee, they must withdraw from the meeting room during the whole of the consideration of that matter and must not participate in any vote on that matter unless a dispensation has been obtained from the Monitoring Officer.

Minutes:

There were none.

2.

Minutes of Previous Meeting pdf icon PDF 93 KB

To approve and sign the minutes of the meeting held on 9 February 2015 as a correct record of the proceedings.

 

Minutes:

RESOLVED: That the minutes of the previous meeting held on 9 February 2015 2015 be agreed and signed by the Chair as a correct record of the proceedings.

3.

Building the Homes we Need to House the People of Lambeth – the Cressingham Gardens Regeneration Project pdf icon PDF 223 KB

    (Report 14/15-155 and appendices)

     

    Tulse Hill ward

    Non-key decision

     

    Cabinet Member for Housing

    Strategic Director, Delivery

    Strategic Director, Commissioning

     

    Contact: Neil Vokes, Programme Director, Strategic Capital Projects; 020 7926 3068; nvokes@lambeth.gov.uk

     

    Additional documents:

    Minutes:

    (Report 14/15-155 and appendices) (Non-key decision)

     

    The Cabinet Member for Housing introduced the report.

     

    The initial 2012 report identified Cressingham as a location for extra housing, part of the administration’s pledge for 1000 extra homes a year.  The option to refurbish the homes at Cressingham Gardens was no longer seen as affordable due to budgetary cuts by the UK Government.

     

    Investing in a refurbishment-only option to bring the estate up to the Lambeth Housing Standard (LHS), with its significant internal improvements and structural issues was in excess of the initial costing of the 2012 LHS business plan (£3.4 million) and meant that work would need to be cancelled on more affordable options elsewhere. 

     

    The Council did not have the luxury of choice and needed to look at affordability.  The Cabinet Member for Housing noted there was a lack of trust, and that having an open discussion had made the process seem disorganised, but noted that this was an improvement on doing it behind closed doors. 

     

    It was highlighted that the estate was designed when London’s population was lower than present and falling; whilst, currently, homelessness was increasing and central Government were not meeting this shortfall – the housing crisis was both a local and a national challenge.  None of the homes would be sold to private landlords (unless a replacement of like-for-like for those currently residing on the estate); whilst all homes would have a lifetime assured tenancy or shared ownership.  Flexible tenancies were not on offer, and the properties would be pegged at Council rent prices in perpetuity.

     

    It was noted that the process took longer than expected and that residents deserved a clear policy, whilst the Council was doing all it could to keep the community together.  Councillor Bennett concluded by thanking Councillor Pickard for her help on these proposals.

     

    Cabinet received representations from the following residents and landlords; Anne Cooper, Helen Carr, Gerlinde Gniewosz, Mariana Nwagboso, David Shead, Elizabeth Guilfoyle, Richard Bultitude and Angie Hill:

     

    • All residential speakers noted the estate’s vibrant community and praised its congenial nature; and that the proposals would irreparably damage this.
    • There were widespread concerns about the democratic nature and fairness of the implementation of the consultation, and in their opinion the report lacked quality.  The removal of option 1 before the main report was also questioned by speakers.
    • Unfavourable comparisons were made with Lambeth Living and how such problems might be negated with this development.  One resident noted that she had had to renovate her current property herself and there was a general consensus that the estate had been neglected by the Council resulting in the large cost of refurbishment.
    • It was noted that the distress caused to residents since 2012, particularly among elderly residents on the estate, would have repercussions on their health and wellbeing; with the impact on locally employed and school-age persons also raised by several residents.
    • There was concern over the special purpose vehicle (SPV), that the proposals seemed to open a route for private capital and  ...  view the full minutes text for item 3.

4.

Environmental Crime Scrutiny Commission: Response and Action Plan pdf icon PDF 96 KB

    (Report 14/15-156 and appendices)

     

    All wards

    Key decision

     

    Cabinet Member for Environment & Sustainability

    Strategic Director, Commissioning

     

    Contact: Kristian Aspinall, Lead Commissioiner, Commissioning; 020 7926 2429; kaspinall@lambeth.gov.uk

     

    Additional documents:

    Minutes:

    (Report 14/15-156 and appendices) (Key decision)

     

    Councillor John Kazantis introduced the report:

     

    • Councillor John Kazantzis thanked fellow Commission members for their work on the response and action plan; highlighting the series of meetings, both Council and public based, that had taken place.  The broad focus was generally on fly-tipping, an issue especially prevalent in southern wards.
    • The Lead Commissioner for Commissioning noted that the majority of actions were already under way; that the proposals safeguarded services and brought them together into 5 neighbourhood teams for an improved, locally-led response.  It was noted that although fixed penalty notices were issued through a private contractor, ticketing was not incentivised.
    • Councillors Imogen Walker and Jane Pickard thanked the team for their hard work and found it heartening that many proposals had already been implemented, noting that residents had already contributed to improving fly-tipping in Knight’s Hill.

     

    RESOLVED:

     

    That the action plan proposed in response to the Commission’s recommendation be approved.

5.

Lambeth Education & Learning Strategy 2015-2018 pdf icon PDF 102 KB

    (Report 14/15-157 and appendix)

     

    All wards

    Key decision

     

    Deputy Leader of the Council (Policy)

    Strategic Director, Delivery

     

    Contact:

    Cathy Twist, Director, Education, Learning & Skills; 020 7926 1541; ctwist@lambeth.gov.uk

     

    Colm Doyle, Delivery Lead, Lambeth School Services, Education, Learning & Skills; 020 7926 8942; cdoyle@lambeth.gov.uk

     

    Additional documents:

    Minutes:

    (Report 14/15-157 and appendix) (Key decision)

     

    The Deputy Leader of the Council (Policy) introduced the report:

     

    • Councillor Imogen Walker noted that for the third year running, for every child whose application was received on time, places had been provided.  This was due to the hard work of the team, with Peter Scott’s contribution acknowledged.
    • The strategy clearly set out the Council’s high ambitions for education, noting that it was on top of their agenda.  However, there still remained work to be done, and by 2018 the Council wanted its schools to all have a ‘good standard’ or higher.
    • Delivery Director for Education, Learning and Skills said that the strategy had been created by schools and parents, and was proud of the work achieved, echoing comments that the importance of education only increased during times of austerity.
    • Councillor Jackie Meldrum noted that the collaboration of schools, parents, and Council in transforming the borough’s educational facilities over the last 5-10 years.  Early intervention, as factored into the report, was essential for helping vulnerable persons.  She also mentioned that Councillor Jack Hopkins had praised the strategy for working with businesses in the area.
    • Councillor Jim Dickson raised the need to understand improvements over the last 10 years and that a study was needed to locate the factors in success; most important was the sharing of information across schools, so that standards rose across the board, not just in a few select institutions.  He noted that it was disappointing that despite recent funding to Trinity Academy Free School, it had seen declining applications.
    • The Delivery Director for Education, Learning and Skills finalised by noting that STEM was key to good schooling, but that a broad and balanced approach was needed.  The report has highlighted that collaboration had been good in Lambeth, with all schools encouraged to work in clusters, including the free schools, so this was to be expected of future free schools also.  There was also feedback between Lambeth Council and the Department for Education about places with a good model free school (Vanguard) in development; and a that Trinity Academy was working carefully with stakeholders to bring greater pupil numbers.

     

    RESOLVED:

     

    That the Education and Learning Strategy 2015-18 be agreed.

6.

Special Educational Needs & Disability (SEND) Review Update pdf icon PDF 145 KB

    (Report 14/15-158)

     

    All wards

    Non-key decision

     

    Deputy Leader of the Council (Policy)

    Cabinet Member for Children & Adult Services

    Strategic Director, Delivery

     

    Contact: Claire Kirwan, Transformation Officer; 020 7926 6678; ckirwan@lambeth.gov.uk

     

    Minutes:

    (Report 14/15-158) (Non-key decision)

     

    The Deputy Leader of the Council (Policy) and Cabinet Member for Children and Adult Services introduced the report:

     

    • Councillor Jackie Meldrum stated that the most vulnerable children in the borough deserve access to education, close to home and as integrated with mainstream institutions as possible.  There was a general move away from separation, with an emphasis to keep children within the borough to reduce their travel and disruption.  The review had taken time due to the careful consultation process, but could report the opening of the Vanguard School on the 17 September or earlier.  The Education, Health and Care plans represented a positive change, resulting in more resources due to increased provision of in-borough places reducing cost of placements.
    • Councillor Lib Peck noted that she would look forward to hearing progress on Vanguard and on staffing and pupil numbers for the 16-25 age groups.

     

    RESOLVED:

     

    That the Council’s implementation of the Children and Families Act 2014 be agreed.